June 23, 2017

You can now reply with GIFs on Facebook (and other cool stuff)


Facebook is celebrating 30 years of GIFs with some new GIF-themed content for its platform, starting with allowing users to send GIFs as replies.

The changes went into effect yesterday, so you should now see a GIF button beside the Emoji and Sticker buttons when you write a reply on Facebook. With this, you can insert a trending GIF, or search for something specific.

Meanwhile, as part of these “celebrations” Facebook has created some 20 GIFs of its own featuring some of “the internet’s most recognizable faces: DNCE, Logan Paul, Amanda Cerny, DREEZY, Patrick Starr, Violet Benson, Wuz Good, Brandi Marie, and Landon Moss.” (No? Me neither.) These can be found by searching #GIFparty when sharing a GIF on Facebook or  Facebook Messenger or by visiting GIPHY.com/Facebook.

Facebook also provided some statistics on how people have been using GIFs on Messenger. Facebook says that almost 13 billion GIFs were sent last year — nearly 25,000 GIFs every minute — and that New Year’s Day 2017 saw the most action, with more than 400 million GIF sends.

Finally, Facebook wants to put an end to the GIF pronunciation debate (“soft g” or “hard g”), so it will poll Facebook users in the US over the next few days. You might encounter this when you log into Facebook on desktop, but you can also visit Facebook’s official page on your mobile phone by searching for “Facebook” in the Facebook app.

You can download the latest version of Facebook via the Play Store link below and give us your thoughts on Facebook’s latest moves in the comments.

Get it from Google Play

Previous updates

Live Chat with Friends

May 23: Facebook’s regular live video chat is good, but sometimes you want to get a little more personal. Live Chat with Friends makes it possible to pull people aside and start a private conversation regarding your video. And the conversation can continue through Facebook Messenger once the live video has concluded.

React to Facebook comments, not just posts

May 5: It was early last year that Facebook introduced us to what the company calls “reactions”: ranging from love to angry, the update did not bring the dislike button that all of us had been waiting for, but it opened up a whole new world for self-expression. These reactions were initially limited to Facebook posts, but the social media giant recently integrated them into its Messenger app. Now, you have the exact six emojis for comments as well.

Snapchat-like camera features

March 28: Facebook has rolled out three new camera-centric features to its Android and iOS apps. The improvements arrive as Facebook takes further steps to compete with the ever-popular messaging app Snapchat — and fans of that might find these new additions quite familiar.

“Direct “essentially mimics the core functionality of Snapchat: you can share photos and videos with specific friends that will be viewable for a limited time only. Stories is a feature which lets you share photos and videos which can be viewed for 24 hours. The last update straight ‘outta Snapchat comes in the form of camera effects. Facebook is rolling out a number these, including filters, masks and “dynamic objects” that can be applied to your snaps. In addition, the camera icon will now be accessible from the top left corner of the Facebook app, or by swiping right on the News Feed, to make photos even easier to take.

Desktop/laptop streaming

March 23: Having enabled live streaming through its mobile app last year, Facebook has announced that live video can now be broadcast from desktop and laptop devices too. Facebook announced the addition on March 22, and you should be able to find the “live video” button at the top of your News Feed or Timeline on the desktop version of the Facebook site. Once you click it, you can follow the prompts to add a description and select your audience, before beginning your broadcast.

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