KSI vs. Logan Paul: Twitch crushes YouTube pay event

Sports

Yesterday there was a huge paying event on YouTube: Logan Paul and KSI youtubers competing in the ring for a boxing match. In Canada, you had to pay $ 13 to watch the event live on YouTube, but netizens found a free way to enjoy the fight with Twitch.

Despite months of promoting the KSI event against Logan Paul on YouTube and the many warnings that would have to be paid to watch the game, “pirates” were able to broadcast on the Twitch platform. A few days before the match, Jake Paul, who also had to fight against youtubeur Deji during the event, explained in a video that it would be impossible to see the event for free. Unfortunately for him, he was wrong. 

Polygon reports that on YouTube, more than 860,000 people watched the paid match; a real success for the platform. But the number of “illegal” broadcasts on Twitch has attracted more than 1.2 million viewers, a huge loss for the YouTube platform.

There are several errors here. Having given exclusivity to YouTube has allowed users to go elsewhere without much impact on other platforms, which did not have the urgent responsibility to remove illegal broadcasts. On YouTube, pirated broadcasts were removed because it was their event. The other problem? Have made a paying event on a platform that radiates normally with its free content. 

If the event had been free, people would have been less motivated to find other sources to take advantage of the event and YouTube would probably have increased its numbers. While the game was touted as “the biggest event on YouTube,” the game generated significant losses that will force YouTube to revise its paid strategies. 

All is not negative, however. The event, held in Manchester, attracted fans from all over the world, according to Polygon . Tickets could cost hundreds of dollars, and the  KSI merch was showcased. 

Why so much interest in a boxing event featuring two youtubers? Recall that Logan Paul has often made headlines for his actions considered shocking. In late 2017, Paul shared a video where you could see the body of a person hanged in the “forest of suicide” in Japan, triggering a controversy. With more than 18 million subscribers on YouTube, the vlogger was likely to attract many viewers wishing to see him triumph or be “farting”. 

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